Good Listening Makes Great Marketing Part II – It’s a CLIQUE!

Good Listening Makes Great Marketing Part II – It’s a CLIQUE!

In Part I of our series on good listening for great marketing, we opened with what makes for poor listening and, thus, less effective marketing. We noted that less than sensitive listening is also bad for interpersonal relationships.

Here in Part II, we’ll focus on how good listening leads to good storytelling and, therefore, great marketing. Because, after all, everyone loves a story and people buy a story, not a brand.

Many businesses and companies retain marketing/PR agencies on whom they rely to capture and share their unique stories. If these agencies are doing their jobs well, they employ a team of curious, thoughtful writers, designers and media specialists who know the right questions to ask, with their clients’ audiences in mind, and can cull a great story that resonates with them.

Even small firms with small budgets, or no budget at all for marketing and PR, can benefit from employing the listening skills that lead to standout stories. But it’s not easy. So much goes into the storytelling process, long before the first word is said. In fact, though skilled writing and graphic rendering is essential, it’s the groundwork that determines the quality of the finished product.

Let’s explore something we at IVY call CLIQUE, the basic elements behind a great story:

Commitment
At its core, content marketing is storytelling. Still, some companies and organizations are unconvinced that blogs, social media, press releases, feature articles, email campaigns, white papers, case studies, newsletters, direct mail, and other manifestations of a story are as critical to successful marketing as they really are.

The belief still lingers that the mere existence of a product or service, along with traditional advertising and a website, is sufficient. “We’re here; they’ll come to us,” is sometimes the mentality. But, more often than not, that statement becomes a question: “We’re here; why aren’t they coming to us?”

In this age of content marketing, consumers are “prosumers,” active and reactive participants in the buyer journey, and only content that is personally meaningful will inspire them.

And the only way to motivate consumers is to commit to a robust content marketing strategy. Modern marketing requires a change in paradigm and a resolve to reach ears and eyeballs through the hard work of creating content into which audiences choose to insert themselves.

Listening
Imagine you are tasked with telling someone what someone else said. What’s needed to do that? Active listening. As we noted in Part I, listening is a skill, not a physical ability. It requires rapt attention without agenda, pre-occupation, judgment, insincerity, impatience, trivializing, or interruption.

Only by truly absorbing what is being expressed can it be accurately and effectively conveyed. This is where a marketing and PR team is key. Professional writers, designers and media specialists are trained listeners whose keen attention to detail and ability to discern what is pertinent, central and unique to your story is invaluable.

Introspection
Between listening and questioning is introspection – that period, however brief, during which skilled listeners internalize what’s being conveyed to them and mentally prepare for the next phase of outgoing questions that will further shape a story. Among many, some of the questions they will ask themselves are: What is the heart of this story? What is special about this person or enterprise? What information is critical, and what is less relevant? How can I share this story in a way that will move audiences?

The process of introspection is extemporaneous, yet highly acute. No matter how much preparation is devoted to an interview or session with someone whose story will be told, conversations can go in any number of directions, and trained listeners must have the ability to think, guide and digest information on their feet.

Questions
While experienced storytellers can make it appear that their questions are off the cuff, they’re anything but. Their inquiries are made only after they’ve listened attentively to their subject(s) and practiced the introspection discussed above. People are endlessly busy, and time is of the essence. Trained listeners do not waste precious face or phone time by asking questions that a) can be answered by a Google search; or b) will not benefit the story in a meaningful, purposeful way.

Asking the right questions is a crucial part of the storytelling process, and questions cannot be squandered. Knowing which ones to ask is the art of a great listener – and a great storyteller.

Understanding
Great listening leads to real understanding. In fact, “I understand” are some of the most affirming words. A gifted storyteller has not simply heard, but deeply grasped, the details, nuances and significance of the story he or she will craft. They “get it.” It is only with genuine understanding that the heart of a story can emerge.

Expression
The final phase of storytelling is the actual telling of it. Today, there are more channels through which to tell a story than ever before, and to have real impact, marketers need to leverage them all. This takes time, talent and a constant finger on the trends and changes not only in the marketing industry, but in one’s own vertical as well.

Beginning with a commitment to employ a content marketing strategy that enables the immeasurable power of storytelling, today’s businesses and organizations can begin a new and very exciting chapter in return on investment.

Let our team of skilled listeners and experienced storytellers share your great story with the world.

 

Good Listening Makes Great Marketing – Part I

Good Listening Makes Great Marketing – Part I

People buy a story, not a brand. In the current age of content marketing, this has never been more true, yet so many tasked with hearing their audiences fail to truly connect with them. Why? Because they fail to listen, and no matter how much time and money is spent in the effort, meaningful consumer engagement is compromised. There can be no good storytelling without good listening.

Effective listening applies to everything from big business to private conversations. Hearing is a physical ability; listening is a skill.

While Marketing 101 traditionally dictates a focus on the positive, sometimes we understand better what to do when we know what not to do, especially if we recognize the undesirable behavior in ourselves. (What’s more, neuroscience suggests that humans are more influenced by bad than good.) Therefore, let’s outline some qualities of poor listening that can also translate into poor marketing.

How to Lose an Audience in 10 Seconds

  • Push your own agenda. Angling for your own motive or gain, whether you’re embarking upon a widespread campaign or simply chatting with your neighbor, is not listening. It conveys that you’re not really interested in the needs, desires or concerns of whomever you’re communicating with; you’re mainly in it for yourself.
  • Steal the thunder. We all know that person who barely lets you get a word out before they jump into their own experience. Marketing efforts can have the same self-preoccupied effect. Brands that boast about the sales they’ve made or lists they’ve topped demonstrate that they’re more interested in touting their own accomplishments than knowing and meeting consumers’ needs.
  • Preach/judge/mock. Few people share a story or experience with someone so that person can shame them or tell them what they should have done instead. Yet, some folks take that opportunity to chide, advise or even ridicule, rather than to simply listen, sympathize or offer real solutions. That mentality has infiltrated more than a few marketing campaigns, too, particularly those that showcase clueless fools whom others can laugh at or feel superior to. Intelligent, thoughtful consumers are turned off by these cheap shots that appeal to the lowest common denominator.
  • Be ingenuine. Consider the many ads featuring actors saying things no one would really say, least of all consumers. Contrived, out-of-touch messaging does not resonate with real audiences. It is insincere, ineffective and shows that you have little grasp on your target market. Perhaps this is why campaigns that humorize true self (think Progressive’s “we can’t save you from becoming your parents” and CitiBank’s voice-throwing identity theft campaigns) are so well-received.
  • Rush things along. Has anyone ever checked their watch or a text while you were talking? Likely, you were less apt to continue at all than to continue more quickly. Marketing and sales efforts that push people to act before they’re ready have the same dissociating effect. Issuing a call-to-action is an important feature of a solid campaign, but it must be done with a keen sensitivity to where people are on the customer journey. That can only be accomplished by listening to what they’re saying – and sometimes what they’re not. For those with the opportunity to meet prospects in person, body language says a lot.
  • Trivialize. Just as it’s rarely wise to tell someone “it’s not that bad,” or “you’re making too much of this,” it’s equally isolating to make light of consumers’ needs and concerns. Consumers respond to brands that acknowledge the gravity of a pain point and don’t try to pretty it up, as if all is right with the world. Any brand that promises they hold the key to eternal happiness will likely be met with great skepticism. As prescription drug campaigns have increased dramatically, it’s hard not to notice the litany of side effects, some arguably worse than the original condition, juxtaposed against all those “shiny, happy people.”
  • Interrupt. Cutting in on someone who’s talking implies many things, first of which is, “what you’re saying is so unimportant, I’m just going to rail right over you.” Indeed, modern consumers can feel railroaded by the barrage of sponsored content, particularly online, that yanks them away from their train of thought. A much more effective approach is to create content that is intrinsically meaningful, customer-centric and organically share-worthy.

In Part II of this blog, our team of experts will share how to employ the good listening tactics that define not only healthy personal connections, but also outstanding storytelling and successful consumer relationships.

IVY MARKETING GROUP. COME GROW WITH US.

 

 

 

 

 

OMG! Acronym FOMO: Don’t Miss Out!

OMG! Acronym FOMO: Don’t Miss Out!

Have you ever been in a business meeting when someone used an acronym you didn’t know? Did you sit there with sweaty palms, hoping your part of the meeting wouldn’t require you to know what it stands for? Did you ask what it means? Or did you quickly and surreptitiously look it up on your device at hand?

Been there.

While the word acronym” was first coined by Bell Laboratories in 1943, acronyms themselves are nothing new. Even the Romans used them (as in the roll-off-your-tongue SPQR for Senatus Populusque Romanus), but more are tossed around these days than ever before.

New ones are born seemingly every day, in every industry and social arena. You’d have to be a walking urban dictionary to know or remember them all. So, forgive yourself your FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out) and accept that you’re never going to keep up.

That said, there are some acronyms that marketing professionals simply CNK (Can’t Not Know, and we just made that up). But first, why is it important to know and use them?

Why Use Acronyms?

  • You’re going to look like a dinosaur if you don’t. Remember that business meeting, when CMO Joe kept dropping DKA (Don’t Know Acronyms), and you felt like a dope? You felt that way for a reason. Anything that’s used in the normal lexicon of your industry should be second nature to you. Otherwise, you and your company look well behind the times.
  • They’re efficient and convenient. It may not seem like such a big deal to type out “as soon as possible” one time, but multiply that by the number of times you convey that sense of urgency in a week, and you’ve added several minutes to your precious time.
  • They save money and trees. If you’re printing hard documents, acronyms take up less room and, thus, use less paper.
  • They’re quicker and easier to say. Consider the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Emergency Guidance Abort Destruct System, for example. Isn’t it just a lot faster and simpler to say NASA’s EGADS?
  • Their brief, snappy character lends itself perfectly to texting and social media, especially on hand-held devices.
  • They’re hip (think young) and fun to use, as in the EGADS example above.

The acronyms one should know off the top of their head depends largely on the business one is in. Because you’re reading a marketing blog, we’re going to focus on that arena, along with its first cousins, social media and email. Keep in mind that the same acronyms can have multiple meanings, depending on the industry. Therefore, it’s best to specify that industry when searching acronyms. For example, “AMA in healthcare.”

We’re not going to include the acronyms that are familiar to the lay person, such as FYI, OMG, ASAP, TGIF, LOL. If you’re not familiar with those, here’s a good primer.

 Top Marketing (and a Few Sales) Acronyms You Need to Know

B2B: Business to Business
B2C
: Business to Consumer
CRM: Customer Relationship Management
MAP: Marketing Automation Platform
RSS: Really Simple Syndication
HTML: Hypertext Markup Language
CPC: Cost Per Click
CPL: Cost Per Lead
CTA: Call to Action
CTR: Click Through Rate
PPC: Pay Per Click
BR: Bounce Rate
SEO: Search Engine Optimization
RFP: Request For Proposal
SAAS: Software As A Service
PR: Lest we insult your intelligence, PR stands for Page Rank as well as the better known Public Relations
SMM: Social Media Marketing
ROI: Return On Investment

Top Social Media Acronyms You Need to Know

FB: Facebook
IG: Instagram
LI: LinkedIn
TW: Twitter
YT: YouTube
AMA: Ask Me Anything
IDK: I Don’t Know
DM: Direct Message
LMK: Let Me Know
IMO/IMHO: In My Opinion/In My Humble Opinion
SMH: Shaking My Head
YOLO: You Only Live Once
JSYK: Just So You Know
ELI5: Explain Like I’m 5
LMAO: Laughing My Ass Off
NSFW: Not Safe For Work

Top Email Acronyms You Need to Know

NRN: No Response Necessary
EOD:
End Of Day
EOM:
End Of Message (allows you to put your brief message in the subject line so email doesn’t need to be opened; e.g., “Meeting at 4:00 – EOM”)
FWD: Forward
BCC: Blind Carbon Copy
CC: Carbon Copy
OOO: Out Of Office
OT: Off Topic
YTD: Year To Date

We at IVY have enjoyed sharing this sampling of common marketing acronyms with you. We ask you to remember one more: our MAPS approach to all your marketing needs. Let us help you make the most of your campaigns in the following areas of expertise:

Marketing
Advertising
Public Relations
Special Events

If you have a favorite acronym(s) that is not on our list, please let us know what it is and what it stands for. Please share this blog on your social media for even more feedback!

IVY MARKETING GROUP. COME GROW WITH US.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 Truths for Content Marketing in 2019

10 Truths for Content Marketing in 2019

  1. Content Marketing IS Marketing
    Of all the developments on the horizon for content marketing in 2019, it is perhaps a shift in paradigm that is most significant. Simply put, content marketing is marketing. Whereas 10 years ago, content was a good thing for marketers to have as an aside to traditional strategies, it is now synonymous with marketing as a whole. Without quality content, marketers cannot establish the two-way communication that is essential to today’s successful consumer relationships.
  2. Video Is Vital
    Video has enormous capacity to capture and keep consumers’ attention. Marketers of the future cannot survive without it. In particular, YouTube (where all marketing videos should land first) has become the second largest search engine, with Google in the first place position.Consider these recent statistics:

 

Clearly, the production and distribution of video content is vital to a viable content marketing campaign. Even if your content is generated by a smart phone, any “action!” is better than none. You can become more sophisticated when time and funds allow, but get rolling now!

  1. Personalization Is Paramount
    According to Psychology Todayfeeling understood is even more important than feeling loved. Knowing who your audience is and what makes them tick is the heart and soul of successful marketing. Marketers who employ highly targeted content are far more likely to create lasting relationships with their customers and prospects than those who are taking stabs in the dark. A 2017 study showed that 79% of companies that exceeded their revenue goals had a personalized digital media strategy in place.No matter how things change in the digital marketing realm, the guiding principle is sure to stay the same: reach the right audience with the right message at the right time in the right way. Personalized content does that best, and not only do consumers welcome targeted messages, they expect it.
  2. Artificial Intelligence Fosters Real Relationships
    While it may seem counter-intuitive that a machine could help form real bonds, nothing could be truer when it comes to marketing with artificial intelligence. Not only does AI (robots, chatbots, algorithms and, eventually, the Internet of Things) shoulder a lot of the “grunt work” traditional marketers had to do, freeing them up to focus on consumer relationships, it also facilitates a more personal, “human” customer experience.Among other capabilities, AI-based marketing can:

    • Customize one-to-one with consumers’ demographics, timing and intent
    • Offer audiences personalized website and social media experiences
    • Enable natural language processing (voice search)
    • Gather and catalog large quantities of data to create accurate customer profiles
    • Identify valuable leads
    • Personalize up-sells and cross-sells
    • Serve relevant messages to prospective customers
    • Generate personalized emails based on customer preferences
    • Judge and respond to human emotions in real time through affective computing technology
  1. Data Is Compulsory
    Analytics will play an even greater role in 2019, as increasingly sophisticated tracking reveals pinpointed consumer insights that marketing budgeters have come to demand. Knowing exactly who is engaging with what content, for how long, on which platform or pages, and when, is invaluable information that businesses now require in determining their marketing ROI. Marketers of the future must be able to supply this information on a regular basis, not only to produce the highly personalized content discussed above but to satisfy client expectations.
  2. Strategy Is Key
    As marketers come to embrace the reality that content marketing is marketing itself, they must also define goals specific to their content. This calls for a guiding, documented strategy. Sixty-five percent of the most successful content marketers have a documented strategy, identifying goals such as lead generation, thought leadership, and SEO. But, as different companies have different goals, no one content strategy fits all. Once unique goals are identified, a documented plan keeps content on task, on track, and intentional about achieving objectives. A documented strategy also allows team members to see what content is and is not working. “Documented strategy is self-correcting,” says content strategist Michael Brenner.
  3. Customer Journey Leads the Way
    Have you ever engaged with a brand to the point of purchase, only to feel abandoned after your wallet entered the picture? That’s a common experience among consumers and one that content marketers must eliminate. The traditional marketing funnel that starts with anyone and everyone and ends with a monetary transaction is moving toward a more fluid, sustainable model. This new version emphasizes customer success throughout the buyer journey, regardless of purchase. It’s about relationships; appropriate content allows marketers to transition from vendors to partners, earning lasting consumer trust and loyalty.
  4. Topic Clusters Boost SEO and Consumer Trust
    As much is known about search engine optimization, there is still so much to learn and understand. (Read our two-part primer on SEO.) But one trend is emerging that deserves particular attention: topic clusters. For brands to position themselves as trusted, respected thought leaders, they need to build content around certain core topics. Deliberate information architecture clearly and methodically demonstrates that owned content is authoritative and attention-worthy – gaining valuable notice from both search engines and consumers.Topic clusters center upon pillar, or hub, content to which more granular sub-topics are connected via hyperlinks. As for SEO, when one cog in the wheel does well, the entire cluster gets a boost in the rankings.

    Source: hubspot.com

  5. Distribution Drives Success
    What good is great content if no one sees it? Distribution is as important as content itself. As long as there are multiple channels of dissemination, casting a wide net continues to be good practice. While social media has gotten the lion’s share of powerful reach, marketers need to remain proactive, open and enthusiastic to all forms of distribution. Perhaps your content could benefit from email marketing, special events, speaking engagements, print, TV or radio ads, or even direct mail (yes, it’s still worth the cost and effort). As author and marketing expert John Hall puts it, “Passive distribution – or worse, distribution you do as an afterthought once you realize no one is engaging with your content – won’t cut it.”
  6. Quality Content Is King
    “Content Is King” is well on its way to becoming a cliché. But just because a glut of content is out there doesn’t mean it’s all good. In fact, much of it is not good at all. No matter how far technology takes us, there is still no substitute for quality content creation and sensitive application to products, services and niche expertise. Just as poor, irrelevant content will drive a wedge between B2B and B2C possibilities, truly meaningful, engaging content that speaks to audiences where they are – or where they want to be – will build bridges that lead to lasting consumer relationships.

 

Our team of experts is here to help you navigate the future of content marketing – today.

IVY MARKETING GROUP. COME GROW WITH US. 

Everyone Has a Story, And Video Tells Yours Best

Everyone Has a Story, And Video Tells Yours Best

 

Consider these compelling facts and figures about the power of video marketing:

  • There are over 73 million video viewers every year
  • 50% of online traffic comes from video viewing
  • 92% of video viewers share videos with others
  • Consumers are at least 64% more likely to purchase a product or service with video representation
  • 75% of business professionals watch promotional videos of relevant products and services at least once a week
  • Videos bring a clearer understanding of product and service benefits
  • Facebook’s algorithm is said to favor videos over other content marketing
  • Videos offer an immediate association to and connection with products and services
  • Visual media gives consumers greater confidence in their purchases
  • Videos lend trust and credibility to the companies and organizations that display them
  • Video content increases sales conversion rates

IVY’s team of experts can create live-action or animated videos like the one here to tell your unique story and bring more traffic to, and engagement with, your website, social media and marketing collateral.

Top photo credit: Complete Business Online

IVY MARKETING GROUP. COME GROW WITH US.

Your Mother Was Right: It’s Good to Share

Your Mother Was Right: It’s Good to Share

The sharing economy has arrived. And if the multiple ways in which it is manifesting itself in the real world (Uber, Lyft, Airbnb, Snapgoods, Rent the Runway, HomeExchange, city bicycles, carpool lanes, social media, and the list goes on) is not proof enough, we have only to look at art imitating life, as it so often does.

In a new T.V. drama called “Wisdom of the Crowd,” Jeremy Piven plays a Silicon Valley tech innovator who uses crowdsourcing to find his daughter’s killer by creating a digital platform on which the entire world can share criminal evidence. An Enterprise car rental commercial features Joel McHale donning a wool cap to appeal to the Millennials who regularly use ride sharing. A feature documentary called “Shareconomy” explores the rise of the sharing economy, which the film claims is “revolutionizing society.”

That the marketing industry would also be affected by the sharing culture should come as no surprise. According to marketing guru Jon Wuebben, it is one of the mega trends of the future of marketing. Consumers want to learn from user-generated content, and they want to be the “experts” in the process as well.

Sharing is a natural act, and everyone, no matter their age, wants to belong to a community. Psychologically and emotionally, the concept of sharing – not owning – products, services or ideas does not require much convincing. But how can marketers leverage this human instinct to share to their advantage?

Establish a robust social media presence. Social media platforms epitomize the sharing economy, and vice versa. Entire communities, often made up of total strangers (the opinions of which Millennials have been found to trust over that of friends and family), come together to share comments, experiences, advice, reviews, and more. In today’s world of interconnectedness, your business must have multiple social media platforms in place. While “possession is 9/10th of the law,” as they say, more is needed than simply having a social media presence.
Actively engage your social communities. Make comments, conversations and reviews easy to provide on your website and social media pages. True, this may invite negative commentary (which can be managed by an administrator), but try to respond to and thank these visitors anyway, because people who hear back from a business are more apt to use them again, despite an initial challenge. This may seem counterintuitive, but customers knowing that their voice is heard goes a long way, and a complaint gives you a backdoor opportunity to show how much you value their satisfaction. Inviting reviews also begets valuable insight into your business and prospects, not only by way of your own platforms, but through online review sites as well.
Tap your best customers. Don’t be afraid to ask your most satisfied customers to offer their positive feedback and experiences. This will not only improve your presence on the review sites mentioned above, it will energize your own website and social media. Ask happy customers to post their success stories, or offer to write them on their behalf (with their approval), and be sure to respond back to them for all to see your generous attitude and gratitude!
Solicit audience content. Ask questions of your audiences, invite them to share their experiences with, or opinions about, your services or industry – or provoke conversations about something unrelated to your business. Maybe audiences could offer their best remedies for the “Mundane Mondays,” for example. On your end, don’t hesitate to share something funny, entertaining, thought-provoking, or comment-worthy. Create a “buzz,” but steer clear of anything that could be construed as political. The more user-generated content you have, the better your brand’s search engine rankings and online visibility.
Use multiple sharing tools. 89 percent of consumers use search engines (which also point to social media platforms and owned media) to help them make purchasing decisions. In addition to creating engaging social media content, be sure to also have a regular blog, video uploads, white papers, case studies, e-books, etc. that can easily be found and shared.
Incentivize your audience. Offer something truly desirable in exchange for customer engagement. Incentives such as referral rewards, gift cards, discounted prices on services, complimentary lunch/dinner…there are many ways to motivate engagement, and participants of the sharing economy not only want rewards, they expect them.
Think outside the box. Really. Yes, there’s an irony in using what’s become a cliché in reference to new and creative thinking, but a team of creative professionals can help you come up with something your competitors would never envision doing. With the online world packed to the gills with boundless information, companies can’t afford to blend in and stay within the margins.
Be fresh, stay fresh. Once you’ve created and enabled multiple channels of user-engaging, sharable content, it is critical to stay on top of it with fresh, regular contributions. Outdated material and old posts say volumes about your brand, none of it good. Not only does new content help SEO (search engine optimization), putting your site above others when people browse the Internet, it also demonstrates that you’re continually alert, curious, learning, teaching, relevant and “checked in.”

While these pointers are proven tactics for success, they’re not always easy to implement. Let our marketing experts help you make the most of the sharing economy that is here to stay and certain to flourish.

IVY MARKETING GROUP. COME GROW WITH US.

It’s addicting!  The fast-paced, ever changing world of public relations and marketing captures your interest and keeps you charged up to learn more everyday.  I love to find the best ways to tell our client’s stories and man, they have awesome stories!

It’s my job to discover our client’s goals and then match the best processes to achieve them, within their budgets, of course.  I get to explore traditional, digital and every manner of communication to determine which tactics, whether it is direct mail or TV advertising, a new website or PPC (to name just a few) will efficiently and effectively capture the attention of prospects. 

I also get to work with great people at IVY – they’re creative, fun, caring and super smart.  We’ve all been around the industry a while so there is not a novice among us.  Our clients are very cool too and totally passionate about the services they offer.  We’ve been working with most of them for years so we know they truly care about being innovative and responsible to the markets they service.  I have great admiration for all of them and look forward to every day. 

It’s true what “they” say, if you love what you do, you won’t work a day of your life!

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IVY was established in 1990 with a basic premise to offer professional, ethical and highly creative marketing, advertising and public relations services. We have successfully maintained our core values and have been part of many amazing projects, client growth and changes in the world of marketing that continue to happen at lightening speed. Most of our clients serve older adults in some capacity so we keep abreast of the opportunities and challenges they face.   Each day, we keep it real and fun and consistently deliver positive results to our clients and their markets.

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As a hybrid graphic and digital designer/web developer with over 17 years of experience, I am always on the lookout for innovative digital and print visual communications. IVY Marketing Group’s broad range of projects keeps my job challenging and rewarding, as each campaign is a new and exciting opportunity to effectively communicate our clients’ messages and help them achieve their goals. It’s my passion!

My body of work encompasses a diverse design style and wide base of clients, ranging from national associations, small businesses and big name brands like Hyatt and LiftMaster. I firmly believe that form follows function and highly value the communicative power of simplicity. 

Areas of professional expertise include Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, Word Press, Responsive Design, CSS3, and HTML5. The industries I’ve served include senior living, health care, hospitality and finance.

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All my life, I have loved writing. As a child, I could often be found in my room “writing a book.” While “novelist” is not (yet) on my resume, I am a storyteller. I believe that everyone and everything has a great story, and it is my joy to find that story and share it with the world.

After earning my bachelor’s degree in journalism and completing my master’s studies in the same field, I joined a small advertising agency with powerhouse clients in the hospitality industry, such as Hyatt, Hilton International and Carnival Cruise Lines. I began as a proofreader and achieved the position of senior copy writer within a year.

After my first son was born, followed by two more, I started a freelance writing business that included (among several others) such clients as Advocate Health Care and Coldwell-Banker Realty. Clients in the education arena included DeVry University’s Becker CPA and Stalla CFA Reviews, DePaul University, and Naperville School District 203, for which I won two state public relations awards.

For nine years, I was employed as Communications Director for a large faith community, where I managed all aspects of internal and external communications. I was writer, editor, designer, web master, and content manager.

As such, I am experienced and comfortable writing multimedia for a broad variety of industries, products and services.

I joined IVY Marketing Group in 2013, when I began writing client press releases on a freelance basis. I loved the work—and my teammates—so much, I was thrilled when I was invited to come on board in a greater capacity.

I have immensely enjoyed getting to know our valued clients in the senior housing industry, the people they serve, and telling the many wonderful stories that come out of content marketing done right—with the love and care our IVY teams puts into everything we do.

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It all starts with one idea. Working with the Ivy creative team for over two decades has always meant taking one great idea and bringing it to life to help our clients meet their goals. We enjoy the challenges offered with every creative opportunity and try to make the design process itself enjoyable for our clients.

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Making certain that the projects IVY produces are word- and picture-perfect is my specialty. But I also love implementing marketing campaigns and programs that bring our clients success. Details are my thing, so it is a pleasure to have worked with IVY twice now, first after college four years ago and, recently, for the past two years.

The IVY Group is a terrific team of creative, positive and talented professionals that I love working with and, judging from the length of stay of our clients, I think they love our team, too!

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Rock-climbing, training for an 80-floor stair climb event, running a 5K…This is just a tiny peek into what people 20 and even 30 years older than I am, are doing on a fairly regular basis at some of the retirement communities that IVY represents.

I’m of the generation that still has reoccurring nightmares about what the next step looked like when my grandmother could no longer live by herself. The very best option at that time was living at a “facility” and  included eating rubbery chicken and playing an occasional game of BINGO. Period. That’s why my parent’s generation begged us not to ever put them into “one of those places.”

I am so proud that IVY’s clients are at the very forefront of an industry that creates opportunities, challenges, and most of all freedom for seniors, allowing them to explore hobbies, interests, passions…the next chapter of their very full lives.

I feel reassured for my own future. Even more, I feel honored to be able to share the impactful stories about this paradigm shift in the world of senior housing. What we hear and see at our clients’ communities is fascinating and inspiring!

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Keeping up to date on new public relations strategies, online engagement tactics, and promotional tools is my passion.

With my hospitality background in marketing top Chicago restaurants and hotels, I was eager to bring fresh concepts and communication strategies to our clients and have really enjoyed learning various industries.

Our clients have such exciting and unique events and programs, which really makes it motivating for me to make the most of their content.  Results like increased sales leads, website visits and social media connections make everyday rewarding and interesting.

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I oversee, plan and implement projects and processes at IVY.  Often,  I am the conduit between our writers and designers, with printers, and other vendors to fulfill the marketing needs for our clients. I also manage media buys and coordinate production of advertisements.

Working for a flexible and fluid company that is constantly growing, changing and evolving is fun and rewarding. There is always something new to learn.

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My bio has a big blank in the beginning—Mom and Dad rescued me in Wisconsin, and no one really knows my origins. They were probably ruff. What matters though is where I am now, running IVY Marketing Group. There are humans here who think they’re in charge. In truth, they do actually have amazing experience in content marketing and public relations, but I’m super important and the center of attention. I mean, look at this face. Right? And I know I’m the top dog because honestly, I’m the only one allowed to sleep through staff meetings and eat things that people drop on the floor.

The fact is though that I truly love staying awake at staff meetings. Everyone talks and laughs and they’re always excited. That surprises me a little because it’s not like anyone has thrown a ball to play fetch or anything. But I guess what gets my pack of peoples’ tails wagging is their work and their clients. I don’t know what a website or a blog is, but I do know that my pack must be good at them because they’ve earned all sorts of awards for these and other things. My bed had to be moved because the framed certificates were taking up so much room. Despite the inconvenience, I’m proud of these awards!

I serve several important purposes at IVY. I always let Mom (and the world) know when the mailman is here. When people come into the office, just one (usually) quick non-invasive (usually) sniff, allows me to determine important characteristics…like if they had anything good for breakfast, own any pets (pet owners are the best!) or if they stepped in anything on the way in. (It’s sort of like me conducting a first job interview.) I generously share my tummy because I know people like to give it a good scratch. I always give kisses, whether one is feeling lonely or not. And I’m always happy to share someone’s meal, especially if they’re trying to lose weight. My pack describes me as being engaging, amusing, and entertaining. (When I hear a siren, I “sing” along and it makes them laugh.) NPR talks about the benefits of having a pet at the workplace. Studies show pets lower stress hormones and improve morale and productivity. I wholeheartedly agree that a dog in the workplace is the best thing since rawhide bones.

As for my pack of people at IVY…they are amazing and always make my tail wag!

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I could not be more thrilled to work alongside the IVY team.

For over 25 years, I have been employed in top executive positions across the Chicago area and have consistently built profitable businesses, generated sales, and developed and launched new product lines.

Strategically positioning companies and commodities for growth is a strong suit I’m eager to bring to ResponderHub™, IVY’s new crisis communications solution. I’m also excited to help expand IVY’s reach in the senior marketing industry.

I believe people are more open than ever to thinking outside the box and looking at new ways to reach their customer base, while at the same time reducing their cost of sale. The senior industry is exploding, and IVY is perfectly positioned to respond to the need for innovative, quality content marketing services and effective crisis communications.

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I love being able to use my skills to help improve other people’s lives, and with a growing elderly population, it’s important to create meaningful and user-friendly digital solutions to aid the senior living industry.I have a wide range of technology and design skills with a deep interest in Human-Computer Interaction– helping IVY provide outstanding web design and print design services. IVY has a long-proven track record of excellence, and I’m proud to be able to help carry on that tradition. 

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